An Alphabet of Websites

ISO 9995-8 telephone keypad diagram.

In my browser, the address bar is so set up that I often have to only type the first couple of letters of the site I want to visit. My most frequently visited sites pop up automatically – it’s like predictive text for web addresses. This makes it quite easy to figure out my most used sites for each letter of the alphabet so … here goes …

A – Art of Narrative

This is a beautiful growing archive of book illustrations with lots of fairytale pictures. Lovely to disappear into for a while and indulge the imagination.

B – Blogger

The Google based and integrated blogging platform that I have used for many years and which hosts, most notably, my Stories from the Borders of Sleep. I guess this one is at the top of the pile because I check my stats far too often.

C – The Chiff and Fipple

A recent obsession with woodwind and especially flutes and whistles puts this at the top. This is THE go-to site for all things relating to the tin whistle/penny whistle. If it’s not covered here or in their forum, it’s not relevant.

D - Download Magnatune

Actually you need a password to access this part of the Magnatune site but this can be obtained for a nominal monthly subscription that gives generous access to all the material in their catalogue. In fact most of what I listen to these days comes from this site because they have a fantastic selection of Jazz, Folk, Ambient, New Age and Baroque music from international artists. For the monthly subscription you get a license to download as much as you want in various formats and permission to distribute up to three copies to friends. Win-win-win!

E – English Forums

It seems that I use this site more than I realise as, during the course of my editing work, I am constantly referring to the current debates in the world of grammar, style and usage.

F – Flickr

No surprises here. This is still THE social network for photography and visual stuff. On my photostream, there is a lot of analogue photography from my extensive collection of pre-digital cameras; although, since the cost of developing curbed my six-films-a-month habit, I have been putting my doodles up here.

G – Gutenberg

A huge collection of literary material in the public domain from the classics to obscure victorian histories. Most of the stuff I consider to be worth reading was written over a hundred years ago so this is where I go to get it for free.

H – Helpguide

Not sure why this comes up; I’ve only used it a couple of times. It is essentially an ad-free resource about all things health related. Articles are contributed by experts in their fields and cover Mental Health, Childhood, Aging and Diseases – anything to do with health.

I - iJourney

Again I’m not sure why this makes it right to the top as I’m not a frequent user of this site, but it is a tremendous source for mindfulness and spirituality, nonviolence and healing related articles, poetry and art. Sweet … need to check it out more often.

J – Jack Hatfield

Jack Hatfield is a mainstay of the international banjo playing fraternity, an educator and contributor to the Banjo Newsletter. Frankly, us banjo players need all the help we can get with our musical affliction.

K – Kayak

Cheap flights finder. I don’t think I’ve actually used them to buy a flight, yet, but I’ve obviously stumbled over there while daydreaming of travelling to faraway places.

L – Last FM

The streaming service and music-based social network that I couldn’t do without. Ad-free listening based on what you have listened to in the past and liked. Last FM streams music to you after figuring out what your taste is. It does not offer you much control over exactly what you listen to (unlike Spotify) but it still suits me a lot better than Spotify. I like a radio station that is tailored to my taste, that helps me to discover new artists and that doesn’t charge for ads-free listening.

M – Musescore

I have tried a lot of different musical notation software over the years and Musescore wins out for intuitive, speedy and flexible interfaces. The site also has a nice social networking element with people sharing music scores, original compositions and arrangements.

N – Noisetrade

Offering a massive catalogue of mainly Christian and indie artists on a free or pay-what-you-want sort of basis. I’ve downloaded a couple of nice things from this site and am particularly fond of the Nashville Film Composers album which totally rocks.

O - Oneworld Publications

As it’s name suggests, this publisher has an inclination towards books with a social consciousness and a current global perspective – philosophy, biography, investigative journalism, that sort of thing. There is a handful from their catalogue on my “to read” list.

P – Pinterest

Yes … well … obviously. Another social network keyed to sharing visual material. Although many people use it as a sort of “wish list” of things they want, it is also a great source of inspirational artwork and photography. I spend a lot of my coffee breaks here and my “pin” boards are at http://pinterest.com/seeingmore/

Q – Quick and Dirty Tips

The home of Mignon Fogarty’s “Grammar Girl” podcast – I don’t know how I’d get by without it. In fact this site is one of the most phenomenal resources of useful and educational material on the web in the form of numerous podcasts and articles.

R – Ron Block

An inspirational banjo player with Alison Krauss and Union Station, but also a deep-souled man of faith, Ron Block is one of my heroes. He is also a fellow George MacDonaldist. Sweet!

S – Seymour Writes

If you are reading this, you are probably on this website right now. This is my main personal blog that also serves as a shop window for my writing and editorial services.

T – The Session

Visited several times a week, this is a huge user-contributed collection of traditional tunes, jigs, reels, polkas, hornpipes, airs from the celtic tradition. I play in a ceilidh band and am somewhat obsessed with traditional music so this website is a lifeline.

U – Using English

I do a little bit of teaching English as a foreign language. I rely on this site a lot for lesson ideas and resources and the occasional grammar related query.

V – V&A Museum

The website for the Victoria and Albert Museum. Actually a really nicely put together and informative website detailing the current and up-coming exhibitions with plenty of little video clips and informative documentary material.

W – Wooden Flute Girls Blog

Not surprisingly, another woodwind resource makes it to the top of the “W”s. This is Christel Rice’s personal blog where she posts, among other things, lots of delicious tin whistle tunes. I have started visiting this site to train myself to learn new tunes by ear rather than from sheet music. She teaches at the New York Irish Center in Queens, NYC. Lots of great stuff for people who are geeky about simple blown instruments.

X – X Files

Iconic, cult viewing from the 90s – Mulder and Scully  … what’s not to love about it. Actually I used to be too scared to watch it and have only got into the series later in life when I am old enough not to be disturbed by the compelling mix of supernatural speculation and conspiracy that underpins it. I think the series treats some pretty profound themes, not least about doubt and faith, that make it well worth re-watching.

Y – YouTube

We unplugged our TV and didn’t bother renewing our licence about a year ago. If I need to collapse in front of a screen nowadays, it is to explore the weird and wonderful world of YouTube. The anarchic geekery is an endless source of fascination, but I don’t only watch people blowing up batteries and putting marshmallows in vaccums. I find it an invaluable source of music and making tutorials as well as news and views. Lately I have been rounding off the day by catching up on news according to Russia Today (quite the most satisfying world reportage available) and blowing my mind with TED talks.

Z – Zahndrew’s Blog  (Creatives)

Andrew Zahn is not an infrequent reader and commenter on this blog but I’m not sure I will ever be able to compete with his energetic and creative blogging habit which has resulted in his site becoming something of a hub for discussion on all things relating to creativity. He’s not just here because of the rarity of the first letter of his surname but because I do actually read most of what he posts and it never fails to inspire without overloading the mind.

Lucky Seven Meme: I got tagged …

manuscript

Photo credit: El Chupacabrito

So I got tagged by Gillian of skybluepinkish …

She’s posted 7 sentences from her current manuscript, “The Dorothy Summer” (check it out), and now it’s my turn:

  • Go to page 7 or 77 in your current manuscript
  • Go to line 7
  • Post on your blog the next 7 lines, or sentences, as they are – no cheating!
  • Tag 7 other authors to do the same

Most of my stuff is less than seven pages (I put up a fresh short story nearly every week at “Stories from the Borders of Sleep“). However, with minimal preamble, here are the seven sentences beginning from the seventh line from the seventh page of my most advanced work-in-progress, a phantasy novelette entitled, “The Coat and Ring”.

Like a man who has been in the sun all day and who through the night gives off the radiance of what he has absorbed, I felt a strong glow from him. It was impossible to tell his age for his skin was well weathered by the elements rather than age, and he gave off an air of rude health. As he looked at me, I also had the impression that he was about to pounce on me and overpower me in a playful attack, like a young cub intent on tussling one of his brothers into submission.

I introduced myself and asked how he came to be there at Terence’s table on this particular night. I wished to discover if Terence had a continuous traffic of guests to whom the same attentive hospitality was shown or if I had stumbled into some sort of occasional celebration.

Selwyn looked at me with slight amusement under his moustache once again and took a few moments to answer me, as if he was weighing whether to play a joke on me or not.

Delightfully random …

So I’m handing the baton on to a few of my favourite writer bloggers (who may or may not appreciate being tagged), but I recommend you check them out anyway:

Valerie Storey at http://valeriestorey.blogspot.co.uk

James Tallet at http://thefourpartland.com

Rolando Garcia at http://phantomimic.weebly.com

Mandy Eve Barnett at http://mandyevebarnett.wordpress.com

Curtiss Ann Matlock at http://curtissannmatlock.com

Marly Youmans at http://thepalaceat2.blogspot.co.uk

Lisa Wright at http://wrightales.com

Amberr Meadows at http://www.amberrisme.com

Java Apps that Make my Little Nokia (almost) a Smartphone

I have had a Nokia 6303, described as “no-nonsense easy-to-use handset” for about 3 years now. I have looked at upgrading to a Blackberry, iPhone, or high-end HTC but I’ve never found a good enough reason to switch to something that costs three or four times as much as this reliable classic. I’m quite sure that some people who think they need a top gadget to do what they want to do don’t realise the potential of these Java enabled handsets running on Symbian 40.

Here’s a few things that give it the edge over  the buggy rushed-to-market do-everything other phones that I have come across:

  • It’s cheap to replace and free on a lot of low monthly tariffs.
  • It’s frightfully robust. I have dropped it on hard floors and in wet grass countless times.
  • The battery life is exceptional. I charge it once a week, which is usually more of a top-up than a full charge. Although I use it only occasionally for longer conversations, I use it constantly for browsing and for twitter, texting and email.
  • GPRS coverage (although a lot slower than 3G, of course) seems to be available absolutely everywhere in the British Isles.
  • There are a huge range of Java apps out there for any purpose and they are generally very reliable.
  • Memory card slot gives me more storage than I need for music on the go.

Here’s my pick of Java apps that give me an almost-smartphone – all of them are also FREE:

Browsing: Opera Mini.

With the slowness of GPRS you need a light and lean browser that is perfectly adapted for a smaller screen. Of all the ones I have tried, Opera wins by a long way. It is very customisable, you can specify the quality of images or eliminate them altogether for faster browsing. Tabbed browsing is supported, too, and works well. Bookmarks can be synchronised online with an Opera account on other machines and it has a built in feed reader – sweet!

Social Networking: Snaptu.

Snaptu has an iPhone like menu of icons and a number of its own internal apps. I use it all the time for Twitter as it handles lists and multiple accounts very smoothly. It’s great for Facebook, too (although I’m not on there any more). Multiple useful tools within Snaptu also include several feed and news readers, a weather app which can be set for multiple locations, and a neat little Google Calendar interface.

Calendar: Gsync.

Synchronises the internal calendar with an online Google Calendar.

Task management: Mobile Task Manager.

This little gem by Tommi Laukkanen has become the final answer to my list-making habit. A lightweight and simple app that manages any number of lists embedded (if you want) to three or four levels. I have my daily to-do list on here as well as shopping lists, gig set lists, project planning outlines e.t.c. It is elegant and unfussy and does the job very nicely thank you.

GPS: Mobile Trail Explorer (MTE).

Again, although these phones don’t have built in GPS, they will connect to a bluetooth GPS unit (of which there are many to choose from) like the BN901S. Mine cost £16 on eBay and I keep it in the car. Mobile Trail Explorer is a fully featured and very flexible GPS tracker once again by the brilliant Tommi Laukkanen. It uses OSM or Google Maps if you need them, caches maps to save data calls, allows you to record and save KML files and various other waypoints systems as well as having a navigation function.

QR Code Reader: Bee Tag.

Using the phone’s built in camera to read QR codes. Seems to work 90% of the time and is certainly adequate to the job although it struggles with tiny codes, this may be more a limitation imposed by the 3.5 megapixel camera.

E-Reader: WattPad.

Thanks to the adjustable smooth scrolling screen, I use WattPad to plough through classics that are free to download (in the public domain). Perfect for reading after lights-out. Most of the contents of Project Gutenberg are available, no shortage of good stuff.

Bible: YouVersion.

Most people I know with Android use this but, the marvelously handy YouVersion is available for Java, too. Unfortunately it doesn’t cache so can be a bit slow sometimes, but there are a wealth of translations to use.

In addition, for email, most of these S40 phones have their own email reader embedded with the texting and messaging menus and they can be set up to synchronise with any POP and SMTP accounts for sending and receiving. Synchronisation can be scheduled or on-demand.

So … er … yep – I don’t see why I should bother putting up with the sort of trouble (and expense) that smartphones have been giving people lately.

Mingling Business and Personal Stuff in Social Media

The question is, “to what extent should I keep my personal and business life separate when using twitter, facebook, and other social media?

The answer is, “It’s up to you.” There are no rules and everyone works out their personal approach to this one, which is one of the beauties of the “Wild West” that is Social Media.

One of the great strengths that social media have brought to business networking is an amplification of the importance of the personal touch and, in my humble opinion, this should be kept in mind. It is one of the strengths of the scene, so the ideal is to exploit that rather than crowbar the old ways of doing things into this rapidly-growing new field.

It is probably going to be simplest to outline some of the decisions I have made and why.

My Personal Brand

There is a rising sector of employment that I and many of my friends are engaged in. What are we selling? Ourselves. We are marketing our unique sets of skills but also our quirkiness and personal attributes that all go together to make a personal brand.

It may sound like an awful sell-out, to reduce myself to a product, but I don’t see it this way, it is more of a natural consequence of doing what you love and what is essentially “you” for a living. Isn’t this what we all long for?

I carry on a number of activities under the broad umbrella of freelance writing and editing, although a more accurate description would probably be “freelance creating” as lately my work has included forays into performance and consulting and I have not ruled out bringing more photography into it.

I don’t take on any old project that will pay, I work on stuff that accords with my principles and values, exploits my strengths and helps me grow as a person. I’m working for myself – in every sense of the word.

Also, very importantly, at this stage almost all (100%) of my work comes from people with whom I have a personal relationship of some sort, or who I have at least met face-to-face. For anyone starting out, the strength of existing networks of relationships cannot be overlooked. This is why I keep “trading” under my own name. I don’t mind potential “customers” knowing that I am a Christian or a Vegan, for instance, and in my experience this is helpful as it helps people to identify the kind of niche that I work in and heads off the requests to write copy for leather handbag sales or to produce erotica, while still opening the way for a diversity of potential projects.

The places where I am “me” are on this blog (which is a shop window where people can sample my work and where I can advocate for the stuff I am passionate about) and on twitter.

LinkedIn and ReferralKey finds a middle ground for me as it is specifically aimed at business networking, so I tend to keep my personal jibber jabber away from them.

Pros (for using yourself as the main brand)

  • Potential customers are encouraged to form a relationship with a person who has a face rather than a machine providing a service.
  • I can openly bring everything that I am to my work.

Cons

  • My tweet stream contains a certain amount of “noise” that is not of interest to clients, as I chat to people or post links that are personally interesting.
  • Some people may be put off by my stance on certain issues.

Other brands

However, under the umbrella of Seymour Jacklin, there are a couple of distinctive brands that I am developing. The first of these has it’s own twitter account and identity. It is called “Mindspective” and is the compartment where I am specifically emphasising my healthcare experience and special interest in mental health. This is primarily an information based project where I am doing writing in a specialised niche. I am less interested in hooking people on to me as a person, here, and it is more about providing something that stands alone, people are attracted by the niche rather than by my skills or personality. Very few of my everyday friends know about Mindspective.

At some point in the future, I my develop Mindspective to involve other contributors or I may sell the site on, so it makes sense to keep it separate from my personal brand.

The second brand is “Stories from the Borders of Sleep.” However, this is a much more personal project, and I use my “me” channels on social media.

I would say that the choice you make over whether to form another social media stream around a specific product will depend on the answers to the following questions:

  1. Will I employ other people in the future?
  2. Will this be set up as a charity, business or NGO in it’s own right at some point in the future?
  3. Am I thinking of selling this on to someone else one day?

General comments

I follow a number of streams on Twitter that are organisations or companies. It is mildly annoying when these are used, by whoever is managing the account, to say “hi” to their friends or carry on protracted correspondence in 141 character bites. I am generally following them because I want news and information.

I know one or two people who simultaneously broadcast exactly the same tweets both on their personal and business accounts and this feels a bit spammy (ahem). I do tend to re-tweet Mindspective from my personal account but never post identical tweets from both. I would say, “don’t do this.”

Many people use different forms of Social Media to do different jobs and keep a sense of separation. For instance, Flickr, is about photography – it overlaps with other stuff I do but it is its own thing. I don’t use MSN, Google Buzz, or any other chat streams for business purposes but I do do business on Skype, LinkedIn, Qype and Referral Key. This enables me to preserve a few corners where it is just about me and my mates chatting on.

It is important to be aware of what you do post and that “Google” forgets nothing. It is worth “googling” your self to see how you look to the online world and think if that needs to be managed or tweaked in any way that it is within your power to influence. Luckily the idiot stuff I posted on forums as a student 10 years ago is now so far down the page ranks as to be negligible.

Having abandoned facebook a few year ago, the only thing that would possibly drive me back there is the potential to use it purely for business.

It can be a nuisance (especially with twitter) having to log in and out of different accounts depending on whether you are in business or personal mode. I make things simpler by using different browsers: Firefox for personal, Chrome for business – it works really well.

In this day and age, quirks, personality, authenticity are the currency of new media, so keep them in there if appropriate.

Well, there’s just a few thoughts from the top of my head, hope it helps …

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