Are You Creative? Send Me Your Card!

I’m a sucker for business cards. Collecting them is like playing a grown-up game of swapsies. Even though we live in a digital age of networking, there’s still nothing quite like taking home a pretty little piece of card with someone’s details on it.

So here’s a thing I’m going to do: If you are a person who works broadly in the area of creativity, art, writing, music, performing arts or that sort of thing, send me your card (either a scan or a “hard copy” – email seymour@seymourjacklin.co.uk for my snail address) and I’ll feature it on this blog and link it to your website … simples!

I have started with a few that were already in my wallet:

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Creative Entrepreneur of the Month: Robyn Trainer of Floral Footsteps

Confucius say, “Make a living from what you love and you’ll never work another day in your life” and although this sounds lovely and has become something of a mantra for our times, anyone who has succeeded in making a living from something they love will be able to tell you there is a lot of hard work involved.

One of the effects of the instability of our economic system seems to have been to loosen the concept of career and employment as many people seek to meet their circumstances creatively, develop alternative streams of income, and question why they do what they do and how much it matters anyway. There is a new breed of creative entrepreneurs who have stopped waiting for someone to employ them and given themselves a job instead. They have said, “The future is so uncertain I might as well take things into my own hands and do something I love instead of waiting for the next round of redundancies.”

These are really exciting times and, once a month, over the next year, I will be profiling some of the creative entrepreneurs who have inspired me and continue to offer the companionable reassurance that we are not alone on the hard road to doing what we love for a living.

I have had the pleasure of working with Robyn Trainer of Floral Footsteps (she provides the artwork for Stories from the Borders of Sleep) and being part of her journey over the last year. She kindly agreed to be my first interviewee for the Creative Entrepreneur of the Month series.

Robyn is a mathematics graduate from Durham who got in the habit of sidestepping the geek label by telling people that she wanted to be a florist one day. She is married to Phil and exercised by a mischievous but adorable spaniel called Samuel. In April 2011, Robyn left her full time job at the Ethical Superstore to give herself fully to her floristry, illustration and photography business, Floral Footsteps. To fully understand how these three strands link together into her unique brand, you really need to see examples of her work and style as displayed on the Floral Footsteps Website.

Robyn says that the combination of three creative practices bounce off one another and although she has a distinctive style that is somehow recognizable in all her work she gets special satisfaction out of creating exactly what a customer wants.

“My work is entirely personal in that each order I create, either a floral arrangement or a bespoke illustration, is unique and designed according to the individual.”

Of course, there is a fourth strand to Robyn’s work, the all-essential business side of things. As anyone who has watched “Dragon’s Den” will know, being outstandingly creative and having business acumen is a very rare combination. Robyn certainly has both, and I dare say the maths comes in handy here, too.

I asked Robyn to give us an insight into her business and offer some thoughts and advice on creative entrepreneurship.

What are you working on at the moment? What’s on the “to do list” this week?

There are plenty of things going on! I’m hoping that my brand new website will be launched either today or tomorrow, which is rather exciting. Samuel the Spaniel (my naughty/adventurous dog) has his very own blog, which started this week. I’m working on a “Celebrations!” Greetings Cards range and a Christmas card range and I’ve wedding flowers to do next week, amongst other things!

So you are thinking about Christmas already! And you have involved the dog in the enterprise!

Samuel the Spaniel is too inspiring to not involve him in the business, and yes, sadly I’m thinking about Christmas already. Where I used to work, Christmas tunes began playing in the beginning of July… I’m not kidding!

How does a typical day look for you as a self-employed person? Do you have any routines you depend on?

I think the only routine I have is: start early, finish late! As I haven’t been trading for long, my work really varies, from building websites, through planning financial forecasts, to actually doing the work of illustrating, designing, working with flowers and meeting with clients. In a year’s time, I’m sure my answer will be different, but for now, each day is very varied.

How many hours a week would you say you are working at the moment?

Probably about 40 – 45?

Do you ever wish for a steady office job?

Not at the moment. Having had one of those, it’s great for stability and regular income, but I found myself longing to do something else. That longing has gone now because I’m actually doing it.

Do you think that you’ll need to have another strand of income while the business grows or is it a case of succeed or bust?

I initially thought that I would, but decided to do the summer season full time. I’m really glad I made this decision. I am considering taking on another strand of income in the autumn, but I’m seeing how that goes. Setting up business is quite hard; it does take quite a lot of investment to begin with.

What made you decide to start Floral Footsteps? Was it a slow burning idea or did you have a moment of epiphany?

I studied Maths at University, but always said “I’m going to become a Florist”. When I finished University, I thought I should really study it and become qualified, to see if I like it and want to take it further. I loved it, and was asked to do a friend’s wedding at the end of the year, which I also thoroughly enjoyed. So from there, working as a florist became something I definitely wanted to do. With regards to the other strands, illustration and photography – these are things I’ve always done and have slowly improved over the years, so it seemed natural to me to incorporate them into a business as a florist. So I’d say it was a slow burning idea.

How did friends and family respond to your decision to go for it?

My parents have been very supportive, but not without their “warnings” about “financial safety”. My husband has been really encouraging along every step of the way and helps me in making some of the bigger decisions and logistics (although he keeps well clear of any actual floristry or illustration! the wiring scares him…) and my friends have been wonderfully supportive by finding ways to involve me, and being my advertisers, giving me cause to start Floral Footsteps officially.

Some people would say you are crazy to try a venture like this in today’s economic climate. What would you say to them?

I’d say that I think one of the main ways in which we can improve our economy is through local business, by supporting one another in their employment. Yes, it is a difficult time to start a business, but I do believe that working with local trades instead of outsourcing to larger companies is the way forward.

So would you say that Floral Footsteps has a socially conscious edge to it?

Yes I would. I’m keen to work more closely with local growers of flowers, foliage and herbs (although that’s not easy in the North East!) and to recycle, reuse and reduce my waste as a business. I’m also keen to support other businesses that are local and eco-friendly in what I do and what stock I buy. I was shocked when I did my floristry course that some florists throw away leftover cellophane, ribbon and non-compostable rubbish with organic waste (loads of it!) in the same bin bag and put it out for collection. Some don’t recycle or compost anything! It’s madness!

How important is blogging to your business?

Very important for me personally, and I think for those closest to me, and for those just dipping their toe in. It provides a pretty unique insight into the person behind the business, as well as the business itself. It also shows you are interested in more than just “making money”…

I guess in these days of social media, people are not so comfortable dealing with “faceless corporations”; they want to know the people they are dealing with and what the story is.

I agree. It’s funny how just communicating over a computer can change the way we feel about someone and give a sense of ownership in what they’re up to and your relationship with them (however virtual or real that may be!)

What is your most important source of referrals?

I think most referrals come from word of mouth. From people telling one another about Floral Footsteps and what I do, and passing on that information. If someone chooses to contact me, I will reply as soon as I can to find out how I can help and be of service

Are there any websites that have been useful to you in your work either for networking or information, or support or anything else?

Well, I keep an eye on lots of different blogs and websites to see what others are up to and support them. I have a profile on lots of different networking platforms and websites including Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, Blogger, Pinterest, Google+ and more to build up an online profile and I also have a shop on Etsy, which I link people to. In terms of specific websites, there are a few wedding blogs which are good to read to check out trends, and twitter is always fantastic for keeping up with the latest news in your business sector.

What are your thoughts about using online markets, like Etsy, versus setting up your own website?

Hmm I’m not sure yet. I have my own website and I have a shop on Etsy, but have chosen to sell goods through Etsy because of the community already established there. It’s easier for people to find you through Etsy than it is through a standalone website.

What advice would you give to someone who wanted to strike out as a creative entrepreneur?

I think they need to assess 1) Is there a need for your business? I.e. – is there a market for it? Will people buy your service or product? And try to think objectively. Will your business make money or is it better as a hobby? 2) Is now the right time for you to financially go for a creative business? It takes time to earn money in setting up a business and the business takes investment, do you need to wait a while until you can afford to set up? 3) Ask your family and friends for advice and support. They know you best. Ask them to be truthful and guiding, as I can say this has been one of the most influential things for me.

Three quite hard things, but you have to ask yourself the difficult questions!

So now another hard question for you: What was the lowest point in the last few months?

Oh, that is a hard question! So often my lowest points are to do with my own confidence, rather than specific events. If I lose confidence in my ability to run a business or in my work, I can fall quite low. It’s then that the support of others really lifts me – in having people who I am accountable to with the business.

On a happier note: Can you put your finger on your favourite project or your highest moment so far?

There have been lots of great moments! Every time I make a bridal bouquet I get a little quiver of excitement and say to myself, “this is actually a bouquet for the bride!” (Yep, geek!) When you see your completed work being appreciated by others, that’s a fantastic moment. I can’t name one in particular really, as each event feels very different! Perhaps handing in my resignation at my old job was a highlight…

Could you describe to me where you hope to be in a year’s time?

In a year’s time, I hope to have full weeks of hands-on floral designs, illustrations and more, keeping busy with clients, fulfilling regular and special orders. Perhaps I’ll be in a slightly more comfortable workspace, too!

That sounds achievable.

I hope so!

And so do I. To find out more about Robyn’s work, check out her website: http://www.floralfootsteps.com or her Etsy shop at: http://www.etsy.com/shop/FloralFootsteps
I am sure she would be happy to answer any more questions. All images in this post are the property of Robyn Trainer.

Mingling Business and Personal Stuff in Social Media

The question is, “to what extent should I keep my personal and business life separate when using twitter, facebook, and other social media?

The answer is, “It’s up to you.” There are no rules and everyone works out their personal approach to this one, which is one of the beauties of the “Wild West” that is Social Media.

One of the great strengths that social media have brought to business networking is an amplification of the importance of the personal touch and, in my humble opinion, this should be kept in mind. It is one of the strengths of the scene, so the ideal is to exploit that rather than crowbar the old ways of doing things into this rapidly-growing new field.

It is probably going to be simplest to outline some of the decisions I have made and why.

My Personal Brand

There is a rising sector of employment that I and many of my friends are engaged in. What are we selling? Ourselves. We are marketing our unique sets of skills but also our quirkiness and personal attributes that all go together to make a personal brand.

It may sound like an awful sell-out, to reduce myself to a product, but I don’t see it this way, it is more of a natural consequence of doing what you love and what is essentially “you” for a living. Isn’t this what we all long for?

I carry on a number of activities under the broad umbrella of freelance writing and editing, although a more accurate description would probably be “freelance creating” as lately my work has included forays into performance and consulting and I have not ruled out bringing more photography into it.

I don’t take on any old project that will pay, I work on stuff that accords with my principles and values, exploits my strengths and helps me grow as a person. I’m working for myself – in every sense of the word.

Also, very importantly, at this stage almost all (100%) of my work comes from people with whom I have a personal relationship of some sort, or who I have at least met face-to-face. For anyone starting out, the strength of existing networks of relationships cannot be overlooked. This is why I keep “trading” under my own name. I don’t mind potential “customers” knowing that I am a Christian or a Vegan, for instance, and in my experience this is helpful as it helps people to identify the kind of niche that I work in and heads off the requests to write copy for leather handbag sales or to produce erotica, while still opening the way for a diversity of potential projects.

The places where I am “me” are on this blog (which is a shop window where people can sample my work and where I can advocate for the stuff I am passionate about) and on twitter.

LinkedIn and ReferralKey finds a middle ground for me as it is specifically aimed at business networking, so I tend to keep my personal jibber jabber away from them.

Pros (for using yourself as the main brand)

  • Potential customers are encouraged to form a relationship with a person who has a face rather than a machine providing a service.
  • I can openly bring everything that I am to my work.

Cons

  • My tweet stream contains a certain amount of “noise” that is not of interest to clients, as I chat to people or post links that are personally interesting.
  • Some people may be put off by my stance on certain issues.

Other brands

However, under the umbrella of Seymour Jacklin, there are a couple of distinctive brands that I am developing. The first of these has it’s own twitter account and identity. It is called “Mindspective” and is the compartment where I am specifically emphasising my healthcare experience and special interest in mental health. This is primarily an information based project where I am doing writing in a specialised niche. I am less interested in hooking people on to me as a person, here, and it is more about providing something that stands alone, people are attracted by the niche rather than by my skills or personality. Very few of my everyday friends know about Mindspective.

At some point in the future, I my develop Mindspective to involve other contributors or I may sell the site on, so it makes sense to keep it separate from my personal brand.

The second brand is “Stories from the Borders of Sleep.” However, this is a much more personal project, and I use my “me” channels on social media.

I would say that the choice you make over whether to form another social media stream around a specific product will depend on the answers to the following questions:

  1. Will I employ other people in the future?
  2. Will this be set up as a charity, business or NGO in it’s own right at some point in the future?
  3. Am I thinking of selling this on to someone else one day?

General comments

I follow a number of streams on Twitter that are organisations or companies. It is mildly annoying when these are used, by whoever is managing the account, to say “hi” to their friends or carry on protracted correspondence in 141 character bites. I am generally following them because I want news and information.

I know one or two people who simultaneously broadcast exactly the same tweets both on their personal and business accounts and this feels a bit spammy (ahem). I do tend to re-tweet Mindspective from my personal account but never post identical tweets from both. I would say, “don’t do this.”

Many people use different forms of Social Media to do different jobs and keep a sense of separation. For instance, Flickr, is about photography – it overlaps with other stuff I do but it is its own thing. I don’t use MSN, Google Buzz, or any other chat streams for business purposes but I do do business on Skype, LinkedIn, Qype and Referral Key. This enables me to preserve a few corners where it is just about me and my mates chatting on.

It is important to be aware of what you do post and that “Google” forgets nothing. It is worth “googling” your self to see how you look to the online world and think if that needs to be managed or tweaked in any way that it is within your power to influence. Luckily the idiot stuff I posted on forums as a student 10 years ago is now so far down the page ranks as to be negligible.

Having abandoned facebook a few year ago, the only thing that would possibly drive me back there is the potential to use it purely for business.

It can be a nuisance (especially with twitter) having to log in and out of different accounts depending on whether you are in business or personal mode. I make things simpler by using different browsers: Firefox for personal, Chrome for business – it works really well.

In this day and age, quirks, personality, authenticity are the currency of new media, so keep them in there if appropriate.

Well, there’s just a few thoughts from the top of my head, hope it helps …

Writers Wednesday: The High Calling of a Writer

French writer and journalist Ernest Daudet (18...
Ernest Daudet Writing (via Wikipedia)

To embark upon a lifelong commitment to making black marks on a white page is a high calling. After several months of jokingly answering the question, “what are you writing” with, “anything people will pay me to write”, it has dawned on me in a series of epiphanies that that is a complete denial of the very things that drew me to this way of life. I thought that I loved words, for their own sake, and the sorcery of marking them accross a page would be enough to satisfy me. When we give ourselves over to creating, it is inevitable that we begin with several months or even years of hammering out what that means before we really get into our stride. During that period, and I am not out of it yet, there are all sorts of blind alleys to go down, but it is all grist to the mill – part of the long road of self discovery and renegotiation that is absolutely necessary for art to happen.

I have learned that I don’t love words for their own sake, I love truth, and stories, and communicating, and connecting, and putting the good stuff out there.

So here are the things that genuinely excite me about writing; the things I need to come back to again and again:

The Public Office of a Scribe
I see a writer’s work as having continuity with the scribes, amanuenses, bards and chroniclers of history. Living, as they did, in an age when literacy was rare, they performed a public duty to record and describe true accounts, to elevate the imagination through poetry and to teach with words. They held a public office and served society with their pens. The burden is still laid upon writers, even in a digital age when anyone can do it, to be unselfish and to add value to life through their work.

Here’s an apt description of the scribe from the book of Ecclesiasticus:

“He seeks out the wisdom of all the ancients, and is concerned with prophecies; he preserves the sayings of the famous and penetrates the subtleties of parables; he seeks out the hidden meanings of proverbs and is at home with the obscurities of parables. He serves among the great and appears before rulers; he travels in foreign lands and learns what is good and evil in the human lot.” (Ecclesiasticus 39:1-4)

How’s that for a job description?

It Is All About Truth
The written word can be used to cover up and to reveal, to tell lies or to exalt truth. It is so tempting to sacrifice integrity when there needs to be money in the bank at the end of the day. I gave up full time nursing to give more time to writing but as I described to a fellow writer the kind of projects I was taking on in order to try and make ends meet he said, “you gave up that for this? I think you’ll get more from nursing.” To be honest, it is one thing to serve others with your pen, but I have learned to be more careful about who.

Reading and Writing Against Loneliness
There is a moment in the film “Shadowlands” where CS Lewis encounters a student in a book shop who appears to be stealing. Later he confronts him:

“I happened to be in Blackwell’s the other day… and I saw you borrow a book.”
“No, steal. I stole it. Most of these books are stolen. They’re written to be read. At least I read them… which is more than most people do.”
“So you read differently to the rest of us, do you?”
“Yes, I do. I read at night. It’s the only thing breaks me concentration. All night sometimes. When I start a new book my hands are shaking. My eyes are jumping ahead… Does he feel the way I felt? Does he see what I’ve seen? You know, my father used to say… He was a teacher like you. Well, not like you. He was only the village schoolmaster…”
“What was it your father used to say?”
“We read to know we’re not alone.”
“Would it help if I made you a small loan?”
“Yes, I expect it would, if I wanted to be helped.”
“I see. Good-bye.”

For all of us, the written word has been a companion, for me, more than anything else, this has been the great comfort it has offered, “I am not alone”. If for no other reason, I have always written to let others know that they are not alone.

Links:

The Written Word is Pure Sorcery – an earlier post about the magical aspects of the craft.

Writers Wednesday: Announcing a Blog Carnival – still seeking submissions from fiction writers who would like to be featured on this blog next Wednesday.

Benjamin Myers – On Writing: Thirteen Theses. Sums it up quite well.

Opportunities vs. Temptations

“Opportunity knocks only once, but temptation leans on the doorbell.”

Can you tell the difference between an opportunity and a temptation? As a freelancing homeworker with a gazillion things clamouring for my attention and no-one telling me what to do from day to day and from hour to hour, it is really quite important that I learn to tell the difference.

I am not a “go getter” in life. I always default to passivity and it’s not something I am proud of but I also reject both go-getter-ism and let-it-happen-ism. There is a third way that assumes that everyone encounters opportunities, maybe five a day, regardless of who they are and what their circumstances. Each opportunity requires active appropriation – it’s the perfect blend of waiting for it and reaching out to grab it. It is not lazy for, as John James Ingalls said, “opportunities are usually disguised as hard work so few people recognise them”. By the slow accumulation of taken opportunities, massive change takes place.

Elbert Hubbard (1856-1915), an early thinker in the Arts and Crafts movement writes in “The Philistine” that:

” … the only place where you can get away from Opportunity is to lie down and die. Opportunity does not trouble dead men, or dead ones who flatter themselves that they are alive.”

It is simply not true for anyone to say that they do not have opportunities. It would be truer to say that we are simply quite poor at detecting their presence. Preoccupied with the demands of the rat-race and the need to maintain our standard of life and retire with a tidy sum, it is easy to think that there is nothing else for us.

Good Morning
A Window of Opportunity

Deep down, I think we all know the difference between an opportunity and a temptation and we can spot it well enough; we just want to kid ourselves that that temptation is really an opportunity.

Opportunities have a different flavour to them, they are like the hint of a scent in the breeze. They are a time-limited phenomenon that catches your attention for a moment, just like that knock on the door. I have a friend who has no qualms about politely addressing strangers on the train, “Please excuse me, but I couldn’t help overhearing you talking about … X … and I happen to be quite interested in that area, myself.” Conversation ensues, contacts are exchanged, connections are made. I envy that ability, but it is a highly developed instinctive recognition of the scent of opportunity. Opportunity, hangs momentarily in the air and then it is gone.

I see opportunities as doorways that stand open for a short time before closing and disappearing. They are always portals to a whole host of further possibilities. They often catch us on the hop and we never have enough time to weigh them before we need to decide. Because they are so transient, we have to prepare ourselves mentally to capitalise on opportunities and this involves being very aware, listening for that timid knock above the incessant, buzz of temptations.

Temptation is less delicate, in fact it is downright rude and it capitalises on missed opportunities saying, “I’m still here, you know … if that other thing doesn’t work out for you, you can always try me.” These nagging possibilities are often the good that is the enemy of the best if they are not monstrous time sinks with rapidly diminishing returns. An opportunity can take a few seconds to engage with and bring massive returns. A temptation sucks everything you have got and when you have finally extricated yourself from it, it sits in the corner making faces at you.

“I knock unbidden once at every gate — If sleeping, wake — if feasting, rise before I turn away — it is the hour of fate, And they who follow me reach every state Mortals desire, and conquer every foe Save death, but those who doubt of hesitate, Condemned to failure, penury and woe, Seek me in vain and uselessly implore, I answer not, and I return no more.” (John James Ingalls, 1833-1900)

I wish the reader all the best in staying awake and saying “yes” and “no” to the right things today.

Two Little Time Management Tips

Being self employed very quickly becomes extremely sucky if the whole question of time management is not brought under control. For me,the quest to manage my time well is ongoing and I expect I will never arrive at an ideal place. Lots of people are on hand with plenty of advice but I think time management strategies need to be as unique as every individual so: I take what I can from others and learn by trying and adapting things.

Here’s a couple of things that work for me:

Do One Thing at a Time

Staying on one task in a discrete time period is more likely to get it finished. I have tried multitasking as a strategy and I have drifted into multitasking as an effect of not having a clear idea about what I want to do – neither were very productive. As a great philosopher once said, “if you do this, you can’t do that.” When I am writing, that’s what I need to be doing, not writing and … answering emails, baking bread and tweeting. To achieve this it really helps to have an egg timer. While that timer is ticking, I’m doing this one thing, be it for 20 minutes or 45 minutes. Only when the buzzer goes, to tell me the time is up, can I change my activity.

Egg Timer
Timed discrete tasks

Hint (for writers): Separate “writing” from “research”. Do all your research and take notes, then do the writing, then go back and plug in more research if needed but if the lines between writing and research get blurry so does everything else in your life – you have been warned!

Get a timer and experiment with different ways to use it. You can check out the “Pomodoro Technique” for one approach, but I am indebted to Mark Forster’s book “Get Everything Done and Still Have Time to Play” for introducing me to a great system based on timers that I have adapted for myself.

Plan the Following Day Before you Sleep

When I wake up there is a pretty direct correlation between how soon I start productive work and how focussed and useful the rest of the day is. I started out by having a board meeting with myself every morning to plan the goals for the day but this could get into a lot of cups of coffee and daydreaming that might go on until lunch time.

It is better to wake up and have your marching orders straight away to get going with. Make a list each evening of the priorities for the following day. This works better for me because:

  • Usually I have a better idea come the end of the day of what needs to be the priority tomorrow which will include stuff I didn’t finish today or other stuff that came up during the day’s work.
  • Thinking about what to do tomorrow will be less likely to keep me awake because it is already written down.
  • Actually being vaguely aware of what is planned for tomorrow is great because my mind quietly turns it over and works on it while I am asleep so I am more mentally prepared for it on waking and my brain is ahead of me already.
  • I can start work pretty much as soon as I’m up so there’s less chance of driving the day into a wall of time wasting and writing it off in the first hour or so.

I think these two simple things have gone a long way to helping me. Anyone else have any suggestions?

Editorial Policies

Suite101 has a 13 year history of providing a place for both casual and dedicated writers to publish articles and generate a passive income. It has also maintained a reputation for being a reliable source of expertise as many of the Suite101 writers are specialists in their field. It is a great place to write, a supportive writing community with a broad range of topics and editors who work hard to ensure consistent quality accross the site. Is some of this about to change?

This month’s revised editorial policy could be a significant shift and I only hope it is in the right direction. For me, one of the great appeals of writing at the Suite were the fair but stringent editorial guidelines and the minimum requirement of 10 articles every three months. Having written for some article aggregators that had neither of these, it was refreshing to come to a place where quality really mattered.

The new policy abandons the minimum requirements and relaxes some of the standards for submissions, allowing for opinion and a voice other than the objective third person. It seems to have been well received by the community and I’ll admit I breathed a little sigh of relief, too. The quotas were tyrannical for people writing in very rare and specialised niches and struggling to generate articles in sufficient quantity. The new policy also provides more scope for creative flair and colour in the writing.

However, I have also been reflecting recently, in light of the buzz around Demand Media and widespread concern about the web becoming flooded with low grade SEO copy, wondering if the frenzied article writing bubble is going to pop any time soon. Search engines are going to have to develop increasingly sophisticted algorithms to ensure that well written and informative content continues to rise to the top. At the end of the day I like robust editorial policies and I like being told when something is not up to scratch. I appreciate and aspire to a professional style. If I want to do opinion in the first person I’ll do it here.

Of course, slightly more relaxed editorial guidelines mean more articles get published, translating to more pages and more revenue for more people – or does it just mean more people competing for a finite number of clicks? Who will be the winner in the long run?

On balance, Suite101 is also opening up opportunities for writers of newsworthy items to have them listed on Google News which has some commitment to the integrity of reportage. The relaxed quotas may also mean that there is not a great change in the number of articles being published but I really hopeThe Suite keeps its reputation for quality intact.

Links:

Demand Media Debate – Content Farming VS Unique Content – By Joe Leija on TMBlog

My Suite101 Profile

Google News Guidelines