Foraging Friday: Shaggy Ink Caps

Shaggy Ink Caps (Coprinus comatus) are a wonderfully “mushroomy” mushroom in both taste and appearance but you need to pick and cook them quickly before they collapse into an inky mush of spores.

Shaggy Ink Cap or Lawyer's Wig

Coprinus comatus - Yummus yummious

The distinctive appearance of this mushroom has earned it the common names “Lawyer’s Wig” and “Shaggy Mane”, both of which are apt descriptions. What can be offputting about them is that as they mature, the margins begin to break down and dissolve into a black liquid that contains the spores – that’s where the “ink” bit comes from. In fact, the whole mushroom disappears into a self digesting black mush within a few hours – nice.

Thankfully, shaggy ink caps are quite common and  have turned many a futile foraging expedition into rich pickings for me. Keep an eye open for these beauties, particularly on roadsides and on waste ground as well as under pines. They have been around for several weeks already and will continue to appear late into autumn.

When picking them go for the younger specimens as always although if you intend to cook and eat them within a couple of hours, a little bit of raggedness around the edges won’t hurt; i.e. if the caps have started “inking”, you will still be able to eat them.

frying mushrooms

In the pan, where they belong!

These mushrooms have a lovely flavour and I enjoy them enormously, fried with onions or liquidised in a soup.

Be aware that although they are a pretty distinctive species there are a number of “inking” mushrooms some of whom it is not advisable to eat at all.  In particular, the much darker Coprinus picaceus can resemble young ink caps. Use a couple of field guides to confirm your identification, preferably consult a friend who nows what to look for, don’t eat anything you are not 100% sure of, cut the mushrooms at the stem rather than pulling them up … blah, blah … please read my more detailed article on Picking and Identifying Edible Mushrooms for some general advice on foraging.

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2 Responses

  1. Well, after my impatient tweeting I have to admit that I’ve not had any success in roadside foraging all day to day… none on Oxford Street, or the Strand, or King’s Road. Have to go further afield next week perhaps. Enjoy yours…

  2. Ah well … keep looking! It is the mushrooms from this family (Coprinus) that tend to play havoc with paving stones and pavements by growing in urban areas so you might be closer to them than you think 🙂

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